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Canonical Data

Canonical Data

Canonicals
What We Give You
Canonical URL
Non-Canonical
Canonical tag in head
Canonical tag is absolute
Page is Canonical
What We Crawl, Scrape, Check & Analyse for You
What This Can Tell You
Related Content
Benefits of this Data

Canonicals

The canonical data that Raptor provides can help reduce time during your analysis whatever it may be. Canonical configurations can massively affect a site and its indexation, using the data that Raptor’s web crawler provides enables you to assess all canonical issues.
Because we perform some analysis on canonical data, we can tell you:

  • If a page is canonical
  • If a page is not canonical
  • If the canonical URL is setup correctly
  • Pages missing a canonical tag

 

What We Give You

We give you a range of information about canonical tags and their URLs, which are each with their own heading described in more detail below. Follow the links provided to learn more about every column of data that we provide.

Canonical URL

This is the URL contained within the canonical tag on a page.

Detailed Look: 

This data is taken from the first canonical tag we find located in the correct location, should there be more than two implemented on a page. Otherwise we show the canonical URL of the canonical tag, regardless of location or implementation issue.

This data is scraped from this canonical tag, using the example canonical tag below:

<link rel="canonical" href="https://www.example.com.au/ "/>

We would show this as the canonical URL:

https://www.example.com.au/

If there is no canonical tag or the tag has no link detailed within it, the field for an entry will be empty. Typically indicating that there is no canonical tag, or at least no useful one present.

Read more about Canonical URLs.

 

Non-Canonical

HTML pages with a canonical tag that links to another page / URL.

Detailed Look: 

If the URL of the page crawled and the canonical URL do not match, then we flag this as a non-canonical page.

This can happen if redirects are not implemented to ensure that only one version of a page can be accessed. It could also indicate that this page is a duplicate of another page of the site and is hence (not canonical).

Read more about Non-Canonical Pages.

 

Canonical tag in head

A check to see if the canonical tag is in the <head> section of the source code, as it should be.

Detailed Look:

This is a simple check that allows you to identify any canonical tags are incorrectly located and hence may not work as intended.

Read more about the Canonical Tag in Head column.

 

Canonical tag is absolute

Checks whether the canonical URL is absolute of relative, with absolute Links being the correct configuration.

Detailed Look: 

This is a simple check that looks to see if the canonical URL is absolute or relative, as they should always be absolute URLs. For the purpose of this check, we look to see if the canonical URL contains at least these components:

http://example.com
https://www.example.com/dir-one/dir-two/sub-dir/page
https://www.example.com/dir-one/dir-two/sub-dir/page/
http://example.com/dir/sub-dir/page
http://sub.example.com/dir/page/
http://www.sub.example.com/page

Red: Required to make the URL / link ‘absolute’

Grey: With only this or less, the URL / link would be ‘relative’

Read more about Canonical tag is absolute.

 

Page is Canonical

HTML/Text pages with a self-referential canonical tag. This means a canonical URL that matches the URL crawled.

Detailed Look:

This is a simple check that looks to see if the canonical URL matches the URL of the page crawled, if they match exactly (with no difference at all), the page is determined to be canonical. If a page is non-canonical it will be marked as ‘false’.

If there is no canonical URL, the page will not be marked as non-canonical because we would be unable to determine this. Instead a page with no canonical tag will be marked as [].

Read more about Page is Canonical.

 

What We Crawl, Scrape, Check & Analyse for You

We do all the following with the web crawler’s scraped data, to determine:

  • If a page is canonical
  • If a page is not-canonical
  • If the canonical URL is setup correctly
  • If the canonical tag is in the <head> section of the source code
  • Pages missing a canonical tag
  • The canonical URL of each page (where present)

 

What This Can Tell You

This canonical data can be used for several things, but with just a small amount of filtering columns you can easily:

  • Find all canonical pages
  • Find all non-canonical pages
  • Find all pages missing a canonical tag
  • Find all pages with canonical tag issues

 

Related Content

The list of guides below might be useful if you are analysing this data and want to more about it:

 

Benefits of this Data

There are several main benefits to analysing canonical data, some of the more popular ones we’ve listed below:

  • Ensure your site’s canonical configuration is setup right
  • Identify duplicate pages
  • Find missing canonical tags
  • Ensure consistency across your canonical tags
  • Ensure your canonical tags are setup right
  • Ensure your canonical tags are working
  • Save Time identifying what pages are canonical

 

So why not sign up for a Free 30-Day Trial today and check for any Canonical Issues on your site.