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Canonical Tag in Head

Canonical Tag in Head

Canonical tag in head
Simple Definition
Values Returned
Canonical tag in head in More Detail:
A Little More About Canonical Tags
Examples of How This Data is Used
- Example 1: Implementation Check
- Example 2: Missing Canonical Tags
Related Content
Benefits of Our Data

Canonical tag in head

The canonical tag should be in the <head></head> section of a page’s source code. Failure to locate the canonical code within this section will likely render it useless / ineffective. This simple check looks at where the canonical tag is located, as it is either in or not in the <head></head> section.

 

Simple Definition

An accessible, HTML page with a canonical tag correctly located in the <head></head> section of the source code.

 

Values Returned

The possible values that the fields in this column will return are as follows:

True = If the canonical tag is in the <head></head> section of the source code, as it should be.

False = If the canonical tag is not in the <head></head> section of the source code, but is elsewhere.

Other = If there is no canonical tag present, a setup issue, multiple on the same page or an implementation error, etc.


Canonical tag in head in More Detail:

This is a simple check that allows you to identify any canonical tags are incorrectly located and hence may not work as intended.

Our web crawler crawls a URL and scrapes the data from the canonical tag, but it also establishes where in the code the tag is located. There are edge cases where containers have been incorrectly closed that can cause issues, but these are not common.

 

A Little More About Canonical Tags

Canonical stuff can have a huge effect on a site, using Raptor and the data our web crawler provides enables you to identify all canonical issues.

To cover some basics. This is what a canonical tag looks like, we have colour coded this to make it a little easier to understand.

<link rel="canonical" href="https://example.com/dir/page/ "/>

Red = This is the HTML (the code) and encompasses the canonical tag

Grey = This is the ‘Canonical URL’ (variable), the part of the tag that you stipulate

The canonical URL needs to be both absolute (see example below) and consistent with the canonical URLs used across the site.

https://example.com/relevant/page-about-something/

Red = The part of the URL required to be canonically consistent.

Grey = The various pages of the site… Subject to rules and best practice.

 

Examples of How This Data is Used

All the data our web crawler scrapes is used in various ways by SEOs or web developers. We provide some examples of these use below.

 

Example 1: Implementation Check

This most obvious use of this data is to check whether canonical tags are implemented properly throughout a site. Because we show whether the tag is present and in the right location, this can highlight implementation problems.

 

Example 2: Missing Canonical Tags

Another simple check that you can do with this data is to ensure that every page that should have a canonical tag, does in fact have one implemented on it.

 

Related Content

The list of guides below might be useful if you are analysing this data and want to know more about it:

Related column headers in Raptor website crawler reports:

 

Benefits of Our Data

Identifying pages that have incorrectly implemented canonical tags is a quick win for most sites. That said there are many benefits to using Raptor’s advanced Web Crawler.

  • Identify pages with improper canonical tag positioning
  • Identify non-canonical pages
  • Fully automated data collection process
  • Get the data you need in the format you need it in
  • Let us do the grunt work
  • Help with multi-region and multi-lingual analysis

One of the benefits mentioned above is working with multi-lingual or regional sites. By using a filter on the URL column, you can check if any of the canonical links are crossing the regional or language segments of the site.

Combined with the other canonical data and analysis we provide, there is no limit to the analysis you can do.